Archive for October, 2017

So we have Manchurian pears against a south facing fence that look like – well half dead. The answer seems to be the soil! Well sorry, I bet its not. Afternoon sun, reflected heat and 2-3 day a week watering and who knows what else. It most likely ain’t the soil!


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A few weeks ago I posted on the stupidity of controlled element formulations.  I can now add to that post as I have received some more information about a few other fertilisers.  The one that’s really been interesting is Troforte™.  I specifically looked at Troforte™ Native.  The really interesting thing is how much higher than all other products is the iron concentration.  The magnesium is not bad either, nearly three times higher than the Macracote™ Grey  range but not as high as Baileys Native or some of the other Polyon™ formulations.

I am will to bet that the superior performance of Troforte™ observed by many has more to do with the amount of iron in it than any added microbes!  A dangerous statement I know but until someone provides me with proper experimental evidence to the contrary I think I will stick by that comment.  Now iron is cheap as chips to buy so you could try adding more iron to any other controlled release product, especially if using it in a wood based mix – and maybe a bit of magnesium too depending on the analysis.  Or you can just dig a little deeper in your pocket and pay the extra for Troforte™.

The disparity in nutrient contents between fertilisers makes it very hard to make a fair comparison between products. Invariably even the N, P and K don’t match up let alone getting down to trace elements.  This is why I am always highly skeptical when someone says one product is better than another.  Seldom are you comparing apples with apples.

Troforte™ is also the only product on my spreadsheet to state a calcium content.  That doesn’t mean the rest don’t have any but its not stated, not even on the SDS sheet and I did ask for complete analyses.  A few other products also don’t state copper, molybdenum or boron contents although their SDS sheets do show those elements to be in there.  Now some plants do require boron in reasonable amounts – carnations, cauliflower, apples and strawberries, for example, so if there truly wasn’t any in there, that would prossibly cause a problem.  Many of these products are imported from America.  A part of me wonders if the lack of boron might be because some irrigation water over there is high in boron and the line between deficiency and toxicity is quite fine.

I don’t have the money to go and analyse all these products but it would be nice to know what really is their analysis.  And why do manufacturers have to be so cagey about what’s in their products.  Not all, but some.  I have encountered this before while working in the Department.  We were compiling a fertiliser spreadsheet that required inputting the analyses of all the fertilisers.  Some resellers were really helpful and quite upfront.  Others were not!

Plant nutrition is not rocket science. There are no secrets.  But I suppose that means there would be no marketing edge for any company wouldn’t it? 🙂



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A question about Manchurian pear trees on the weekend in the local newspaper. The reply was: Don’t add any more fertiliser because its locked up and the balance of the soil is wrong.

This sounds like a statement straight out of Albrecht (now well disproved in most circles). He preached it was all about balance – before they were familiar with the effects of pH.

The person even said they have others growing well but two aren’t and they are in a corner – near a fence, block of limestone? Reflected heat in a corner? Maybe they are getting half the irrigation of the rest from a sprinkler by virtue of the fact they are in a corner. If six are fine then the problem is an isolated patch of soil/microclimate or maybe, but unlikely the plant is the problem.

Switch to Growsafe mineral fertiliser. No kickbacks here? And a foliar fertiliser such as Turbotrace every two weeks. No kickbacks you say?

Are the plants potbound, how big are they? How long have they been in the ground? Anything been going on around them? Even next door over the fence, not necessarily within the owners place. These are all questions I would ask before I started recommending – wait – more fertiliser!

This is Perth. It’s a Manchurian pear. Is the soil wet through the profile? And what is the pH? I am willing to bet the problem is lack of water/non wetting soil, even building debris/chunks of limestone in a particular spot. No nutrients will be taken up if the soil is dry. End of story. As for microbes – without soil organic matter they will not survive. And if the soil is actually soil, with clay and organic matter, it will have its own microflora which will prevail. Providing they have water.

I have nothing against microbes but one thing no one ever considers is the nutrient profile of a fertiliser eg a slow release. They aren’t all the same. It is FAR MORE LIKELY the nutrient difference between fertilisers causes the differences, not the fact some have microbes in them. I have encountered a very good example recently where the fertiliser concerned was found to have negligible magnesium and iron in it. And we are talking a major brand.

Foliar fertilising is most often a waste of time except in very specific circumstances. Plants were designed to talk up fertiliser through their roots. If they aren’t, fix that problem first.

Having spent my life diagnosing plant problems I shudder when I see some of these gardening column questions and replies. I don’t know which is worse – the person writing in with the problem or the person answering it.

I often diagnose remotely. But at the least I ask for pics. And tests sometimes. And often you can start with the basics. Dig around the base. Check soil wetness. Look for chunks of limestone or building debris. Watch the sprinklers at work – is one blocked are they all watering properly? In my experience its most often the basics. And in Perth non wetting soil/lack of water is the biggie. Followed by pH especially in coastal areas. More in my other blog posts on all this sort of thing.

Incidentally I have no problem with Growsafe fertiiser, or Troforte for that matter but I don’t use either because I don’t see the need. I buy straight NPK either quick or controlled release.

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