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During summer, growers experience a lot of problems with tomatoes. This article deals with the effects of temperature on tomatoes – on pollination and fruit set and also on ripening.  I will deal with diseases in another post.

Tomatoes are affected by high temperatures in a number of ways. Some sensitive varieties are affected when average daily temperatures exceed 25°C, whereas more heat tolerant cultivars are not impacted until daytime (maximum) temperatures exceed 32°C. There are even some cultivars are able to set fruit at temperatures above 35°C.

Under marginal conditions fruit may set without adequate pollination but the internal fruit segments will contain few seeds and the tomato will be flat sided and puffy. Irregular pollination can also cause ‘cat facing’ (http://vric.ucdavis.edu/veg_info/catface.htm).

In general fruit set is adversely affected when temperatures fall below 10°C or rise above 27°C. Optimum temperature for fruit set is 18° to 24°C. Even moderate increases in mean daily temperature (from 28/22°C to 32/26°C day/night) result in a significant decrease in fruit set.

As a general rule, the 8 to 13 day period prior to flowering is the most critical phase. If the average maximum temperature in that time exceeds 29°C, pollination and fruit set are impacted. However as pointed out earlier, this does vary according to cultivar.

Why aren’t my tomatoes ripening?

In hot weather people expect fruit to ripen faster. But with tomatoes the optimum temperature for ripening is 21 to 24ºC. When temperatures exceed 29 to 32ºC, the ripening process slows significantly or even stops. At these temperatures, lycopene and carotene, the pigments giving the fruit their typical orange to red appearance cannot be produced and so the fruit stays green.

For tomatoes light has very little to do with ripening. Light is not needed for ripening and fruit exposed to direct sunlight can heat to levels that inhibit pigment synthesis (As explained above). Direct sun can also lead to sunburn. Do not remove leaves in an effort to ripen fruit. Also, soil fertility doesn’t play much of a role. High magnesium and low potassium can cause blotchy or uneven ripening or yellow shoulders. But slowness to ripen is generally not due to poor nutrition and adding more fertilizer won’t help.

You can remove fruit which are just showing the first colour changes (mature green), and store them at 21-24ºC in the dark, preferably in an enclosed space or in the presence of fruit that give off ethylene gas such as bananas. This may speed up the process by up to five days.

References and further reading

http://www.managingclimate.gov.au/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/Critical-temperature-thresholds_Tomato_V2.pdf

http://cvp.cce.cornell.edu/submission.php?id=91

 

 

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